Did you know that the windshield is actually part of your car’s overall structural integrity support system? It protects you from being ejected during a crash, ensures that the airbags deploy as designed and prevents you from being crushed by the vehicle’s roof during a rollover accident. Sometimes, it does not operate as intended. In fact, it is not unusual for our Nashville car accident attorneys to see injuries caused by broken glass.

Understanding the Makeup of a Windshield

Manufacturers produce windshields with collision safety in mind. By adding lamination in between two thin sheets of glass, the windshield will not shatter as a regular window might. The goal is for the glass to adhere to the vinyl sheet rather than send shards flying into the cabin. This technology is not in play when manufacturing most side windows.

Broken Glass Injuries

While the specialized production method of the windshield is designed to keep you safe from glass shards, the process is not foolproof. Depending on the severity of the accident, broken glass injuries can and do happen.

  • Lacerations. Caused by broken glass in the passenger cabin of the vehicle during and after an accident, lacerations damage the skin’s outer layer. You frequently see these wounds when the head or arm suffers blunt force trauma by connecting with a glass surface.
  • Skin cuts. When glass penetrates all layers of skin, the cuts may present in the form of stabs from shards or tears from coming in contact with long, broken glass surfaces. Stab-like wounds in particular can be life threatening.
  • Secondary conditions. Depending on the speed with which you receive proper treatment, you may also face infections and scarring.

If you have suffered broken glass injuries during a vehicle collision, contact us to learn how to protect your rights and get the insurance company to pay for the treatments you need.