Let the slacking off begin! It’s time to start the holiday season. And with that proclamation comes multiple servings of traffic warnings that will make you want to plug your ears with grandpa’s cornbread stuffing.

 

It’s true that Thanksgiving weekend is the busiest for airplane and automobile traffic in the United States. Even though 2009 stats showed the lowest number of traffic fatalities since 1950, Middle Tennessee area police are still on the lookout for travelers not buckled in.

 

Now, we can’t sugar coat this – or should that be cover this with toasty, gooey marshmallows? – but we have made it as easy as possible for you to brush up on Tennessee seat belt and child passenger laws right here before you’re resigned to a full turkey coma.

 

Tennessee Seat Belt Law

 

  • — No person shall operate a passenger motor vehicle on any highway in this state unless such person and all passengers four (4) years of age or older are restrained by a safety belt at all times the vehicle is in forward motion.

 

  • — Any person transporting any child, under one (1) year of age, or any child, weighing twenty pounds (20 lbs.) or less, in a motor vehicle upon a road, street or highway of Tennessee is responsible for the protection of the child and properly using a child passenger restraint system in a rear facing position, meeting federal motor vehicle safety standards in the rear seat if available or according to the child safety restraint system or vehicle manufacturer’s instructions.

 

Tennessee Child Passenger Law

 

  • — Any person transporting any child, one (1) through three (3) years of age weighing greater than twenty pounds (20 lbs.), in a motor vehicle upon a road, street or highway of Tennessee is responsible for the protection of the child and properly using a child passenger restraint system in a forward facing position, meeting federal motor vehicle safety standards in the rear seat if available or according to the child safety restraint system or vehicle manufacturer’s instructions.

 

  • — Any person transporting any child, four (4) through eight (8) years of age and measuring less than four feet, nine inches (4′ 9″) in height, in a passenger motor vehicle upon a road, street or highway of Tennessee is responsible for the protection of the child and properly using a belt positioning booster seat system, meeting federal motor vehicle safety standards in the rear seat if available or according to the child safety restraint system or vehicle manufacturer’s instructions.

 

 

Additionally, if you and your family are headed to another state for the long weekend, make sure you do some research on the other states’ seat belt laws, too. Everyone will be thankful when you safely arrive for the Thanksgiving feast.

 

We here at Mitch Grissim & Associates Attorneys At Law wish you a safe and very happy Thanksgiving weekend!